Grown in the Timiná region of Huila in the southern part of Colombia. Raphael Amaya is famousfor his wild fermentation and is achieving great tastes and wild profiles. After years of trials, he standardised his fermentation by tasting the coffee at different stages. He found that when the lot he was fermenting, the flavour sweet spot to be when it tasted similar to an overripe orange after which was the stage after it tasting like passionfruit.

Nick our Head Roaster had the chance to visit Rafaels farm in November of last year and in his own words labeled him a ‘Wizard with coffee’. The degree to which he is able to push the fermentation process is quite extraordinary (anaerobic fermentation for 60 – 120 hours depending on the weather conditions) and he goes to huge lengths to extend this time frame; moving the coffee with donkeys to cooler parts of the valley to slow down the process.

Once fermentation is complete the parchment is then washed and spread out to dry until it reaches the desired moisture content.

The resulting flavour is aromas of orange, chocolate, florals and tropical fruits. It’s very juicy and have notes of molasses, cola, mandarin and guava.

He has a humble little farm but makes incredible coffee, if you just had the conversation we had with Nick about this special Micro-lot you’d be all in!

What’s the difference between flavour and aroma you ask?
Aroma is the term used to describe the scent of the coffee. Along with acidity, and body, it’s one of the principal categories used by professional tasters in cupping. Flavour is the combination of the three above, resulting in the overall perception of the coffee.

What’s the difference between flavour and aroma you ask?
Aroma is the term used to describe the scent of the coffee. Along with acidity, and body, it’s one of the principal categories used by professional tasters in cupping. Flavour is the combination of the three above, resulting in the overall perception of the coffee.